The Best Title of a Piece of Art

Last weekend I ventured over to the Joan Miró exhibit at the National Gallery of Art, “The Ladder of Escape.”  I recommend everyone go to see it. The show is an extensive collection of Miró’s artwork, and lets the viewer get a better understanding of this surrealist artist’s background, which assists in getting to know these unusual works of art.

I don’t claim to be the most knowledgeable person on Miró, or even the biggest fan of his work, but a few of his pieces in the show, did stand out to me. My favorite piece in the show is titled, “Still Life With Old Shoe.”

My brother and I made the comment that it looks a lot like those cool art projects kids do where you scratch off a (usually) black film to create a drawing, only to reveal a rainbow of colors underneath. This piece also stuck with me because it looked especially trippy, as if he was on some sort of psychedelic drugs when it was created. This piece was also one of the less abstracted images he produced. Unlike many of Miró’s more famous pieces, the objects in this composition are at least recognizable to some degree.

But the real winner in the show is a certain piece with not only the longest title I’ve ever seen for a piece of art, but also the best title. The title is so awesome that I witnessed a few people in the exhibit try to take a picture of the caption, which was for some reason not allowed. The piece is below and see if you can guess what it might be called:

This piece is absolutely bizarre, and more characteristic of Miró’s more well known work. Primary colors are key as well as a heavy use of black and mixed line weights. So are you ready for this remarkable title? This piece is called:
Woman Stabbed By The  Sun Reciting Rocket Poems In The Geometrical Shapes Of The Musical Bat Spittle Fight Of The Sea.

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